The Shadow and the Trickster: Alive and Well in Psychotherapy

In mainstream modern psychotherapy, there seems to have become an emphasis on “positive psychology”, “strengths based practice”, “evidence based practice” and “mindfulness”. Not to mention therapy that is completed in 6-10 sessions, as the expected format of completion. Darker themes and problematic snares seem to be resolved by cheerful, thoughtful, scientific attitude (if their very existence is acknowledged at all).

This presentation takes the position that the Shadow and the Trickster are lurking in the vicinity of every psychotherapy and every therapy session; and at times, they are lurking with intent. The clinician who practices without some conceptualization of these two powerful archetypes may be, not only naïve, but inadvertently exposing her or himself to a world of distress. And perhaps, even more alarming, such a clinician might be missing a complexity and richness provided by these archetypes and the dynamics in which they manifest, which can lead to profound and valuable change.

The Shadow and the Trickster will be considered here with regards to their appearance in the client’s life, in the therapist’s psyche and in the dynamics of the therapeutic interaction. Case snippets and cultural phenomena will be used as illustration. The role of these two archetypes in the current presentation of therapy in our society today will be considered.

About Paul Gibney
Paul Gibney, Ph.D. is a psychotherapist and family therapist who has been in full-time private practice in Brisbane since 1988. His doctoral thesis (1993) focused on the theoretical relationship between psychoanalysis, systemic therapy, time in therapy, and the matter of context. His theoretical and academic interests and practical contributions to the field have been in the areas of brief therapy, systemic practice, Jungian psychotherapy and psychoanalytic thought. He has a deep interest in ‘everyday therapy’, and how to apply complex frameworks to the practical demands of the real world. He has consulted and supervised across a wide range of institutional settings.

Paul worked as a psychiatric social worker for a decade in public practice and for ten years held a part-time senior lectureship, teaching Advanced Casework and Family Therapy in the Social Work Department at the University of Queensland. Paul currently provides consultation and professional supervision to agencies providing services in trauma recovery, child health, trans-cultural psychiatry, child protection and residential care. His current research interests are in the areas of professional supervision and developing personal frameworks for practice.

Healing through Collective Consciousness

Yildiz Sethi offers a presentation on the nature of the mind, consciousness and wellness as proposed by the curiosity and innovations of the original wave of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic giants and how this has developed into the present.

She discusses developments in the science, neuroscience, epigenetics and quantum physics that have greatly contributed to where we are now in the new wave of psychotherapy that is available.

Yildiz is the director and practitioner of Family Constellations and deeply involved in utilising Collective Consciousness for therapeutic outcomes for individuals and family.

She explores Energy and how the links between the mind, generational mind and collective consciousness are demonstrated in the process of Family Constellations, showing that we are all connected. Within this she presents how collective consciousness known as the Knowing Field in Constellation terms, accesses the generational mind in unlocking trauma, unresolved emotional and psychological baggage to allow self-healing to take place for individuals and the family system. Yildiz shows the links between neuroscience, epigenetics and quantum physics providing evidence for healing nature of energy work through the collective unconscious. Showing how the mind and consciousness operates and has the capacity to heal.

Yildiz Sethi is part Turkish/Cypriot and part English, was born in England and came to Australia with her young family in 1986 as a physics and chemistry teacher. At a sensitive point in her life she was introduced to Vedic astrology and her spiritual curiosity was reawakened.

She started an intense study of Vedic astrology where she became fascinated with karmic cycles. She felt the call to move away from teaching to follow this passion but was torn, as she enjoyed teaching. After a year of struggle she became sick and decided to listen to her body. She left teaching to become more engrossed in her Vedic astrology studies.

Through her studies and practice, new questions arose. Isn’t it possible to change karmic cycles? Do we have to remain in constant cycles of suffering? This led her to become a Master of Counselling and a search to find better and more effective ways of working with consciousness and wellness for deep change and transformation. She became a clinical hypnotherapist, NLP practitioner and Family Constellations practitioner. Later she became an author and the founder of two new psychotherapies. – Emotional Mind Integration and Rapid Core Healing.

Yildiz has been in private practice since 2000 and continues to learn and grow and assist others through sessions, workshops, training, speaking and writing. Yildiz is the author of three books: Stardust on the Spiritual Path, Be Rich AND Spiritual and Rapid Core Healing.

https://rapidcorehealing.com
https://familyconstellations.com.au
https://emotionalmindintegration.com
https://vedicastrology.net.au

Christmas Presentation and Gathering

We will have a light festive supper and a presentation by Lynette Fox on her recent visit to Jung’s homes
Please bring some food to share. Light beverages will be provided as well as our usual tea and coffee.

"“There is a deep meaningful relationship between people and their surroundings – the landscapes, houses and rooms in which they live and work.”"
  — Ruth Ammann

Come join me as I show photos and tell stories of my visits to Carl Jung’s home at Kusnacht and his Tower at Bollingen. In 2008, I travelled to Zurich, Switzerland to participate in an Advanced Sandplay Therapy training being held at the C. G. Jung Institute at Kusnacht. Afterwards I stayed on to attend one week of the International Summer School that is also offered there. It was during these weeks of study, that various tours were organized for interested students.

I was able to visit Jung’s house which was a short walk from the Institute. I was like Alice in Wonderland, upon entering into the space where Carl had lived and worked. One of Jung’s grandsons Andreas resided in the house then, he greeted us with the same wicked sparkle in his smiling eyes as his grandfather had possessed. Walking up the internal circular stairs to Jung’s study and library we passed by old medieval maps in dark wooden frames, hanging on the curved walls, further up paintings of sailing ships tossed about on dark stormy seas. When the tour was over I asked Andreas if I could sit near the boat shed for a while, “Of course” he said welcomingly and I wandered alone thinking of the clients Jung had seen in these grounds.

A week later, a group of us went by train along the lake of Zurich to Rapperswil where we alighted and walked to the tower at Bollingen. It was a long, hot walk, we walk past a holy site with grotto and painting of a saint on the back wall. We waited under the shady trees that the tower backed into, for another grandson, Hans, the caretaker to arrive. In the quiet, I take in the back of the tower, the hewn marks on the stones, probably made by Jung himself…..

Lynette has a teaching background, having taught across Early Childhood, Primary and Tertiary Educational settings. She has had a number of different roles in education – classroom teacher; director of a Community Kindergarten; tutor in the Early Literacy In-service Course, National Literacy project and curriculum writer for Education Queensland.

As a counsellor she incorporated Jungian concepts into her counselling practice. During this time Lynette was a senior trainer teaching Sandplay Therapy, both internationally and in Australia for Expressive Therapies Institute of Australia.

In 2013, Lynette commenced training in Analytical Psychology. Currently, she works mainly with adults in her psychotherapy practice in Brisbane. She holds candidate status as she completes her Analytical Psychology training with ANZSJA (Australia and New Zealand Society of Jungian Analysts).

Anima mundi: The return of soul to the world

Jung’s later work intimated the renaissance of the ancient understanding of an ensouled world, of an anima mundi in which the human psyche participates and shares the same ordering principles of meaning. Yet we live today in a world which the legacies of modernism, positivism, scientism, and economic rationalism have left profoundly dis-enchanted.

In this presentation we will begin to explore James Hillman’s four tenets of Archetypal Psychology as developed in his seminal work, Re-Visioning Psychology (1975): seeing through, imagining, falling apart, and soul-making. Using poetry, story, and image to illustrate and amplify these ideas, we’ll see how they can instigate profound shifts in perspective which begin to re-awaken and cultivate soul and soulfulness in the small cracks of our everyday lives.

“Let us imagine the anima mundi as that particular soul-spark, that seminal image, which offers itself through each thing in its visible form….For if the world is ensouled, then the language psychoanalysis has developed for psyche is also appropriate to the world and its objects. To pursue this re-vision of psychic reality implies that we shall have to let our present sustaining paradigm break down, a catastrophe of the mind rather than of the world, allowing to emerge a renaissance of soul in the midst of the world, and with it, from the depths of its breakdown and ours, a renaissance of psychology.” – James Hillman, (1982). Anima mundi: The return of soul to the world. Spring, 1982.

About Suzanne Cremen Davidson Suzanne is a doctoral candidate at La Trobe University Melbourne, developing a depth psychological and imaginal approach to vocation and careers. She holds two Masters degrees from the Pacifica Graduate Institute (USA) in engaged humanities and mythology, and Jungian and archetypal studies. A former lawyer, she has a background in conference and program design, publishing, and career and organisational development. Suzanne is passionate about envisioning, communicating and leading new and meaningful possibilities for extending Jungian and archetypal theories and practices into the world. She is the current President of the Queensland Jung Society.

Soul’s Beauty: James Hillman and the Revival of Renaissance Psychology

Like Jung, James Hillman was a deeply learned and original thinker who looked to the wisdom of the past to understand the human soul. Hillman sought to enrich and extend Jung’s ideas, which he saw as being in a direct line of descent from Plato, through the Neo-Platonists to the Renaissance and beyond.

Hillman credited the 15th century Florentine Neo-Platonic philosopher Marsilio Ficino with re-awakening the concept of soul in Western thought. Indeed, the City of Florence awarded Hillman a medal for his work in reviving this aspect of Renaissance culture and thought.

Marsilio Ficino, under the patronage of the Medici family, established an Academy along the lines of Plato’s Academy, and it is speculated that Renaissance artists such as Michelangelo and Botticelli were influenced by the Platonic ideas taught at the Academy.

In Ficino’s Book of Life, one finds the main concepts that characterise Hillman’s thought – soul / anima and the mediating function of soul between body and spirit, Anima Mundi (World Soul), Beauty personified as Venus, and polytheism.

For Hillman, Soul is that which mediates between us and events or phenomena, enabling us to make meaning of and give value to them – to experience them through reflection, dream, image and fantasy. The Soul is concerned with love and with religion; it is the imaginative possibility of our natures. And Beauty is inherent and essential to Soul.

In this talk we shall visit 15th century Florence, its philosophers and its artists, and reflect upon the essence of Renaissance psychology – Beauty, Soul and Image.

Anne Di Lauro practises as a therapist from a Jungian perspective and is a former president of the C.G. Jung Society of Queensland. She lived for some years in Florence and has a keen interest in the Florentine Renaissance.

James Hillman: Elder of the Men’s Movement

Post-Jungian James Hillman who died in 2011 remains one of the most original and influential voices in American depth psychology. Embodying the opposites, he is at once the cranky intellectual Senex and the soaring brilliant Puer. As a development and divergence from Jung’s work he founded ‘Archetypal Psychology’ and along with Robert Bly, Michael Meade and others gave voice to the Mytho-Poetic Men’s Movement the aim of which was restoration of soul on both an individual and collective level. The movement was a visceral response to the effects of Feminism on the male psyche. It was concerned with: shadow, wildness, shame, violence, dispossession, the relationship between fathers and sons and ‘getting free of mother.’ The movement was energised by highly creative events: theatre, music, storytelling and poetry. Hillman, Bly and Meade co-edited a poetry anthology called “The Rag and Bone Shop of the Heart.”

Jackie Leven was a cult figure in the 80’s UK post Punk scene. His life had degenerated into drug filled madness when he met Hillman and Bly in the US and came under their influence. Their work spoke directly to his soul and influenced a prodigious creative output that lasted till his death less than three weeks after Hillman. When Leven returned to the UK in 1994 he established an alternative treatment centre for addiction called ‘The Core Trust’ and made his first solo album.

Within a spiritual vessel that holds the height and depth of human experience, this work describes Leven’s descent into the underworld of drugs and violence and the redemptive journey: the loss and regaining of soul. Leven’s rich melodious voice is supported by impressive instrumentals and the distinctive voice of Robert Bly, reciting works of poetry.

This talk will introduce Hillman the man and his ideas. After an overview there will be a deeper consideration of the major themes that he brought to the Men’s Movement. The vehicle for this will be poetry and Leven’s music, presenting the possibility to move deeply into the felt experience and complexity of the themes as well as being a starting point for discussion.

Marie Makinson is the vice president of The C G Jung Society of Queensland. She trained at the Guild of Analytical Psychology in London returning to Australia to practice in 2004. Marie lives and works in Northern NSW as well as practicing Jungian psychotherapy and sandplay therapy in Brisbane. She been deeply influenced by Hillman’s work since encountering it in the mid 90’s. Marie says: “Hillman’s work was like a golden thread reconnecting me with the terror and beauty of ancient deities remembered dimly in the deepest recesses of my being. A great iconoclast and magical wordsmith, his divine and diamonic vision returned soul more deeply to my world.

The Quest for Wholeness: A Musical Workshop

As Dr Jung emphasized in the first chapter of his Red Book, it is imperative that we each find our own way. “…my path is not your path.” He has called this journey: individuation. It involves going deeply within, a process which can be facilitated by the power of music.

Participants will experience and explore the transformative power of the sacred 7 tones and choose 2 that are most significant for them. These tones are chanted by the group and woven into an improvisation on the violin, spontaneously evoking images and insight. These paint a surprisingly full picture of the psyche, setting the scene for healing, release and creative expression.

“…Music reaches the deep archetypal material that we can only sometimes reach in our analytical work with patients “ – Jung exclaimed after his first music therapy session. Musical training is not necessary. Please bring your own lunch, and paper and colours to the workshop.

To register for this seminar, complete the form on page 7. Attendance certificates will be issued. Information (07) 3511 0167 or dilauro@ozemail.com.au

In her early years Mary Masselos had a successful career as a concert violinist. She played in orchestras and as a soloist in Australia, Italy, the United States, England and Holland. It was during this time that she became aware of the power of individual tones – of their ability to touch spiritual depths – and made the decision to train as a music therapist. She completed a Diploma in Music Therapy at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, London, followed by a Certificate in Psychodynamic Counseling at the Westminster Pastoral Foundation, London (of which Dr Carl Jung was the first patron).vvv Concurrently she worked with Jungian analysts Joel Ryce-Menuhin of London and Aniela Jaffé of Zürich. Both analysts encouraged her to continue with and further develop her method of using the seven tones as a diagnostic and healing tool. Mary has given workshops in New York, London and throughout Australia, but for now she practises full time in Sydney, where she continues to hold workshops aimed at helping people open themselves to the transformative energy embedded in the spectrum of sound.

The Transcendent Nature of Cosmic Sound and its Relevance for Individuation

The Ancients conceived of the heavenly bodies joining in a cosmic chant as they move in stately manner across the sky.

As Mary will demonstrate musically, the innate character and power of the seven tones can promote inner and outer harmony on a personal level. Using her violin Mary will improvise for the group, and as we listen, really listen with open hearts, we can experience a connection with something greater, something beyond our every-day lives – a feeling of kinship with all things*. *italics a quote from the last page of Jung’s Memories, Dreams, Reflections.

In her early years Mary Masselos had a successful career as a concert violinist. She played in orchestras and as a soloist in Australia, Italy, the United States, England and Holland. It was during this time that she became aware of the power of individual tones – of their ability to touch spiritual depths – and made the decision to train as a music therapist. She completed a Diploma in Music Therapy at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, London, followed by a Certificate in Psychodynamic Counseling at the Westminster Pastoral Foundation, London (of which Dr Carl Jung was the first patron).

Concurrently she worked with Jungian analysts Joel Ryce-Menuhin of London and Aniela Jaffé of Zürich. Both analysts encouraged her to continue with and further develop her method of using the seven tones as a diagnostic and healing tool.

Mary has given workshops in New York, London and throughout Australia, but for now she practises full time in Sydney, where she continues to hold workshops aimed at helping people open themselves to the transformative energy embedded in the spectrum of sound.

Between Shame and A Dangerous Method: Reflections on Archetypal Sexuality and Individuation

Dr. Jung has been the recipient of much criticism over the years, as it is known that he had sexual relationships with at least two of his patients. His affair with Sabina Spielrein was recently depicted in the film A DANGEROUS METHOD.

This presentation does not aim at being an apology, nor a political re-imagining, of Jung’s behaviour. Rather it hopes to look beyond the obvious controversy, to consider the role of sexuality and relationship in the individuation process.

This presentation does not aim at being an apology, nor a political re-imagining, of Jung’s behaviour. Rather it hopes to look beyond the obvious controversy, to consider the role of sexuality and relTo access the material, two films will be considered as primary data : the aforementioned A DANGEROUS METHOD, and a tale of compulsive sexuality , SHAME. Comparisons between these films (utilised as dream material ), will bring forward reflections on archetypal sexuality and individuation.ationship in the individuation process.

Dr. Paul Gibney is a psychotherapist and a family therapist who works in private practice in Brisbane. Paul is the author of over 30 academic papers and of the text The Pragmatics of Therapeutic Practice. His theoretical and practice interests include psychoanalysis, Jungian psychotherapy, Systemic Family Therapy, Second Practice and creativity in the therapeutic domain.

Circumambulating the Centre: The Symbolism of the Bees, the Honey, and the Hive

The symbolism of the bee, honey and the hive intertwine but at the core is the imagery of the circumambulation of the centre—for bees, this is a dynamic in the service of the queen bee and the preservation of the hive; in depth psychological terms, circumambulation is linked with mandala symbolism or the archetype of inner order: an archetype that Jung said was perhaps the most important.

This centre- or inner-directed focus, a dynamic of movement (circulation or rotation) around a centre, not only is fundamental to the human religious instinct but also is quintessential in what CG Jung expresses, in descriptions rich in alchemical imagery, of the psychological individuation process in which the centre is named the Self or inner god-image.

This lecture involves an approach to the alchemical union of opposites through symbolism related to the life and nature of the bee. Some particular opposites associated with the bee, honey and the hive include those of love and war, sweetness and bitterness, the individual and multiplicity, light and dark, order and chaos, industry and laziness, earth and heaven/the sky, sun and moon, spirit and matter, fertility and sterility, regeneration and death. This lecture will explore some of these as Frith brings together her practical experience as a beekeeper and insights gained in her work in Depth psychology.

Bees have been of high value and fascination to humans for millennia—venerated, yet feared. The way a hive of bees lives and works tirelessly in the service of its queen and to produce honey, a marvellous golden substance, is a living mystery. As honey producers and crucial pollinators of the plants that provide food for humankind, bees are like the saviours of the macrocosm, mentioned in alchemy. (Frith Luton, 2007)

Frith completed her analyst training in Zurich. Her passionate interest in nature, literature and the symbolic life has been strong since childhood. Frith has been a professional book editor for 25 years and holds a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) in History and a Diploma of Education from the University of Melbourne, a Graduate Diploma in Editing and Publishing (RMIT) and a Master of Analytical Psychology (UWS). Her book Bees, Honey and the Hive: Circumambulating the Centre was published by Inner City Books in 2011.