Carl Jung, the Gnostic Gospels and Mary Magdalene

A presentation by Joanna Kujawa

Thursday July 2 2015 7.30 —9.30pm
The Quaker House, 10 Hampson Street, Kelvin Grove (park on Prospect Terrace)
Members and Concessions: $10, Non-members $15

Abstract/Summary:

The knowledge of the inner self and the feminine principle of creation are not concepts familiar to the Christian scriptures. Yet, about 40 gospels and letters were discovered over the last 150 years that throw a different light on both. Considered heretical and rejected in the fourth century, Gnostic Gospels, talk about the knowledge of the inner self, the importance of the feminine principle in creation, and the knowledge of the soul as juxtaposed to a belief. Indeed, the word Gnosis means ‘self-knowledge’ or ‘inner knowing’. In this talk, I would like to briefly discuss the fascinating discovery of the Gnostic Gospels, some of their teachings which inspired Carl Jung’s work since 1912. Jung himself claimed that Gnostics were his intellectual predecessors and an inexhaustible source of the collective unconscious especially for his concepts of psyche, archetypes, and the feminine. My focus will be on the relationship between Carl Jung’s Gnostic essay ‘Seven Sermons to the Dead’ and the Gospel of Mary Magdalene, the Gospel of Philip and the Gnostic creation myths in general.

Joanna is an author, speaker and scholar.

Joanna’s short stories and essays have been published in Australia, Canada, the UK and Poland. She writes about transformative experiences and their catalysts –
desire, quest for knowledge and love. In 2012, she published a book about her Gnostic
pilgrimage to Jerusalem (Jerusalem Diary: Searching for the Tomb and House of Jesus)
which was a bestseller in its category on Amazon.com and The Book Depository for
a year and a half. She also holds a BA, MA (University of Toronto and the Pontifical
Institute and PhD (Monash).

Magdalene by Winifred Sangys 1860

Magdalene by Winifred Sangys 1860