Evolution of a Symbol

A Presentation by Marie Makinson

Thursday, June 1, 2017 7.30-9.30
he Quaker House, 10 Hampson Street
Kelvin Grove (park on Prospect Terrace)
Members and Concession: $10, Non-members $15

 

The symbol is not of course an external truth, but it is psychologically true, for it was and is the bridge to all that is best in human.”  (Jung 1956:231)

 

For Jung, culture results from the impact and impression of the archetypes on human consciousness. In this dynamic meeting,  human culture evolves through a revelation of the divine reflected through the lens of human consciousness. The emergent material is expressed and contained in numinous sacred symbols where it continues to develop. Ultimately symbols move back into the unconscious, the ‘numinosum’ is transferred elsewhere, often they degrade, disappear or re-emerge as something darker.

Jung tells us in many places in his work about the importance of the symbol. Unlike Freud he is not talking about that which can be reduced to certain meanings but rather something mysterious that is a key to his whole psychology. How can we understand ‘the symbol’? And how does the symbol affect the psyche... and the psyche, the symbol?

In this presentation we will follow the long evolution of a symbol. We will look at many images, consider myths, divinities, stories, movies and dreams. In all this around and about, following the image as it moves through time and psyche, I think we will learn something about the symbol, the psyche and be left with much to ponder... 

What she proposes is that Care is manifest not only between one living thing and another, but might be said of the “expression” that happens at the meeting of any forms or matter, which, together, release hidden qualities at the depths of being. Care is, therefore, portrayed as a kind of causality. Sharon explores this idea through the particular kinds of materials and objects – fabrics, paper, thin wood - that she has worked with in her recent sculptures and drawings. Given, as these materials are, in extent rather than depth they demand a particular attention that migrates between protection and ruin. From the observations and reflections made in this study, she suggests that the materials that we choose or are drawn to, furnish images of self, and therefore, as we engage in creative practice, we both form and are formed.

 

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Marie Makinson is a former president of the CG Jung Society of Queensland. She believes that Jung opened the door to a psychology that is a path to our individual human potential as well as a powerful vision for shaping our collective future. She is passionate about understanding, furthering and sharing Jung’s psychology and vision. Marie is a senior Jungian analyst trained in London with GAP and is also a member of ANZSJA and IAAP.

She works as a Jungian analyst and Sandplay therapist in Brisbane.